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HURRICANE IKE:

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Call 281.476.2237 for information about emergency response incidents at member facilities and off-site transportation incidents (such as a tanker truck, rail car, pipeline, or marine vessel) that may impact Shoreacres or the surrounding community.

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CLICK HERE To See Answers to Frequently Ask Questions
Frequently Asked Questions

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT HURRICANE IKE RECOVERY

If you don't see your question already answered here please send it to ike@cityofshoreacres.us for consideration and possible inclusion on this Frequently Asked Question list.

Watch for regular updates and new information. This page was last updated Tuesday, February 14, 2017.

TOPICS

Debris Removal

Why didn't they pick up all the debris in front of my house?

When will the city stop picking up debris?

If I demolish my house will I get free debris removal from the city or am I on my own?

Flood Elevation

Can the City tell me what the elevation of my house is today?

Can I get a new Elevation Certificate from the City?

Is the 18-foot Minimum Base Flood Elevation and Zone VE (velocity hazard) along Miramar new?

I have an elevation certificate that shows that my house is above the MBFE and I still flooded. Is that possible or is my elevation certificate wrong?

Is the city considering raising the MBFE above what the flood maps currently state?

Floodproofing

Is "Dry Floodproofing" a home with masonry walls an acceptable alternative to elevating the house to meet the flood requirements?

Substantial Damage

What is Substantial Damage?

When you refer to 50% damage to the structure of the house what is considered and included in the structure of the house?

Substantial Damage Raising Slab Elevation

If my slab-on-grade foundation house has been determined to have "substantial damage" and therefore is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet can I assume that the home and slab must be demolished?

If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet wouldn't the house be considered a total loss?

If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet what can I expect the flood insurance policy to pay?

If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet are there other resources available to pay for demolition and removal?

 

 

 

 

 


DEBRIS REMOVAL

  Why didn't they pick up all the debris in front of my house?

  There are a number of reasons why all of the debris may not have been picked up.
1. Different types of debris are picked up separately. Vegetation (brush & limbs), demolition debris, household waste, appliances, and household hazardous waste are handled separately. Debris that is mixed together may not be picked up until separated.
2. Debris can only be collected from public streets and public property. The streets include the full width of public right-of-way, not just the paved surface. Typical streets in Shoreacres are 60-feet wide and include both the ditches and a good part of your front lawn. Debris that's not in the street cannot be collected.
3. Some items are too big or too small for each type of handling equipment and will need to wait for another pick up cycle.
4. And finally, it might have been simply missed. If so there's no need to call, it will be picked up on the next collection pass. We anticipate several rounds of collection will be necessary to get everything. 

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  When will the city stop picking up debris?

  The city's contractor will continue to collect debris from the streets until October 24 and may be extended beyond that date subject to need and available funding.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  If I demolish my house will I get free debris removal from the city or am I on my own?

  In those cases where houses are required to be demolished an additional $30,000 may be available under NFIP Increase Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage. See FloodSmart.gov for more information.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

FLOOD ELEVATION

  Can the City tell me what the elevation of my house is today?

  Maybe. The City might have a copy of a previous Elevation Certificate for your home in their files. It's worth a call to City Hall to see. Call 281.471.2244 and ask for Rhonda.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  Can I get a new Elevation Certificate from the City?

  Yes. To assist in our recovery from Hurricane Ike the City Engineer will prepare an Elevation Certificate that can be used to determine if your house is at, above or below the MBFE for a fee of $150. If the house elevation is raised to or above the MBFE the Elevation Only Elevation Certificate can be reissued as a Final Elevation Certificate for an additional $250. The Final Elevation Certificate can be used to obtain flood insurance.

The City Engineer can also prepare a Complete Elevation Certificate for houses that are presently at or above the MBFE for a fee of $400. The Complete Elevation Certificate can be used to obtain flood insurance.

Application for Elevation Certificate


Fees must be paid in advance at the time of application. Applications are accepted at City Hall during normal business hours. Fees may be paid by cash, check or major credit card. The homeowner will be provided the original Elevation Certificate and the City will retain a copy. Allow 7 to 14 days for the completion of the survey and Elevation Certificate.

This is a temporary program and may be withdrawn at anytime without notice.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  Is the 18-foot Minimum Base Flood Elevation and Zone VE (velocity hazard) along Miramar new?

  No. Neither is zone or MBFE are new. But there were other changes on Miramar south of Oakdale that became effective with the new June 18, 2007 Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM).

On the previous map (September 30, 1992) large portions of the city were indicated as Zone X, areas that did not have an elevation determination (no MBFE requirement). One of those areas included two blocks of Miramar south of Oakdale. On the new map that portion of Miramar is now in Zone AE a Special Flood Hazard (100-year flood) zone with a MBFE of 13-feet.

The new map has not created any change of hazard zone or MBFE for Miramar north of Oakdale. Both the 2007 and 1992 FIRM maps indicate Miramar north of Oakdale as being Zone VE, a Special Flood Hazard (100-year flood) coastal flood zone with velocity hazard (wave action). Both maps also show an elevation determination which results in a MBFE of 18-feet.

The current FIRM map can be viewed online by entering a street address in the Product Search box on the FEMA website msc.fema.gov/.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  I have an elevation certificate that shows that my house is above the MBFE and I still flooded. Is that possible or is my elevation certificate wrong?

  There is evidence that Hurricane Ike generated flood levels in excess of the 1% predicted level (100-year floodplain) in the City of Shoreacres. The storm surge associated with Hurricane Ike also caused uneven water levels inland from Galveston Bay.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  Is the city considering raising the MBFE above what the flood maps currently state?

  The city hase no plans to consider raising the MBFE.  A number of years ago the city adopted a Minimum Base Flood Elevation (MBFE) that includes one-foot of freeboard. The result is that the city's MBFE is one-foot above the elevation appearing on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM).

[ TOPIC LIST ]

FLOODPROOFING

  Is "Dry Floodproofing" a home with masonry walls an acceptable alternative to elevating the house to meet the flood requirements?

  No. Dry floodproofing cannot be used instead of elevating a house that suffered has Substantial Damage.

FEMA Publication 312, "Homeowner's Guide to Retrofitting" provides information about dry floodproofing, but also provides a notice that reads, "WARNING: Dry floodproofing cannot be used to bring a substantially damaged or substantially improved house into compliance with the requirements of your community’s floodplain management ordinance or law."

[ TOPIC LIST ]

SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE

  What is Substantial Damage?

  Substantial Damage is defined as damage to the structure to the extent that the total cost of restoring that structure to its before damaged condition would equal or exceed 50 percent of the market value before the damage occurred. Land value is excluded from the determination.

Houses that have suffered Substantial Damage will be required to have the lowest floor elevated to or above the minimum base flood elevation (MBFE). FEMA requires the City to adopt local regulations that define the Substantial Damage threshold as 50% (or less) and enforce the requirement for elevation to or above the MBFE. The City of Shoreacres defines Substantial Damage as 50%.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  When you refer to 50% damage to the structure of the house what is considered and included in the structure of the house?

  For purposes of estimating damage a building is divided into 16 general construction categories.
All of the following items are considered to determine damages:
(1) Foundation - Type and quality.
(2) Superstructure (Wood Frame/Masonry) - Structural members that support the roof, such as rafters, trusses, etc., up to but not including the roof sheathing, are included as part of the superstructure. Includes wood frame construction, load bearing walls, interior wall framing, exterior structural panel wall sheathing, exterior wall covers and masonry veneer.
(3) Roofing - Roof sheathing, covering, flashing, other elements that are part of the roof covering, and shingles.
(4) Insulation & Weather Stripping - Wall and ceiling insulation.
(5) Exterior Finish - Stucco, siding (aluminum, vinyl, or wood), masonry or stone veneer.
(6) Interior Finish (plaster/drywall) - Finish on all interior walls and ceilings, including wallpaper, and paneling.
(7) Doors-Windows-Shutters - Interior and exterior.
(8) Lumber Finished - Trim and moldings around door frames, baseboards, casings, chair rails, and ceilings.
(9) Hardware - Interior door, cabinet, garage, and window handles, locks, and hinges. Exterior door handles, hinges, and locks.
(10) Cabinets-Countertops
(11) Floor Covering -
Includes carpet, hardwood, vinyl composition tile, sheet vinyl floor cover, ceramic tile and marble.
(12) Plumbing - Plumbing fixtures and plumbing rough-in.
(13) Electrical - Basic wiring for outlets, switches, and lighting. Circuit breaker or junction box. Outlets for a washer, dryer, stove, or refrigerator. Exterior lighting around doors and garage.
(14) Built-in Appliances - Common types of built-in appliances.
(15) Heating-Cooling - Forced-air heating and cooling system with ductwork.
(16) Painting - Any painting not specifically mentioned elsewhere in this list.

[ TOPIC LIST ]

SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE RAISING SLAB ELEVATION

  If my slab-on-grade foundation house has been determined to have "substantial damage" and therefore is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet can I assume that the home and slab must be demolished?

  No. [Answer Pending].

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet wouldn't the house be considered a total loss?

  No. [Answer Pending].

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet what can I expect the flood insurance policy to pay?

  [Answer Pending].

[ TOPIC LIST ]

  If my slab-on-grade foundation house is required to have the lower floor elevated 4-feet are there other resources available to pay for demolition and removal?

  Yes. [Answer Pending].

[ TOPIC LIST ]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Every effort is made to ensure that the information provided on this and subsequent pages is timely and correct; however, users should keep in mind that this information is provided only as a public convenience. In any case where legal reliance on information is required, the official records of the City of Shoreacres should be consulted.

  • The information on this and subsequent pages is not intended to be legal advice. Please consult your attorney for legal advice.

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